Device connectivity has been one of the major advances in wireless and cloud technology. Now you can access the same data, in real-time, from your desktop, laptop, and mobile devices. The question is: How do you do it? Some companies make it easier than others. Google uses their Drive service. Apple provides a Cloud ID. Let’s take a few moments to see how Microsoft allows you to sync your PC with your Windows devices.

Microsoft’s version of Drive/Cloud is called OneDrive. It is a free download on all of your devices, and you get 15GB of storage space without having to purchase an Office 365 account. A personal Office 365 subscription boosts that storage by another 20GB (it costs about $70 a year to get the subscription from Microsoft, but you will find a product key for half that on Amazon). A business Office 365 account adds 50GB of data and allow up to 300 users to have access. For most people, the free service will be more than enough space.

You can also connect your Windows phone to your laptop while on the go in order to have Internet access anywhere. Be aware that you will be using your phone’s data plan, and online computing is more data intensive than mobile online activity, so be sure you have enough data to avoid overages. On your phone, you will need to access the system settings. The Internet Sharing feature will allow you to turn your phone into a hotspot. Make sure to password protect the Internet connection if you do not want everyone else around you to be burning through your data. From there, your laptop will see your phone as an available network. Just log in and surf away.

OneDrive is unfortunately much better for documents and presentations than it is for audio and video files. Microsoft still makes Zune software to manage your multimedia across devices. In fact, if the software is on both your phone and your computer, you do not even need your USB cord. There should be an option to sync your PC or other devices wirelessly.