How Google™ Glass Connects With Humanity

While we aren’t seeing the streets lined with people sporting Google™ Glass quite yet, that future may not be far off. And while many hope the connectivity will be a positive advancement, there are also concerns that the carry-on distraction, this “wearable computer,” may just lead to more disconnect from reality.

Right now, it would cost you about $1500 to become a beta tester—and that’s why you aren’t seeing more people wearing the glasses of the future. You get what you pay for, of course, as you’re literally wearing the Internet. Tilt your head, say a few words and the whole world gets pumped into your eyes and ears. But with everything being shoved directly into your head, what happens to the part of the world that’s actually around you?

Here’s the scenario. Glass keeps Google, the Internet and social media constantly in front of a person. So how are people going to function while using it, and where will this focus come from? The answer may be from everything else. In reality, its effect depends on the user. Will you allow Glass to become your reality or simply a supplement of it? Will you be reading your email instead of focusing on the road? Will you be updating your status while on a date?

Even worse—will anyone notice? You don’t have to take Google™ Glass out of your pocket to check on something; people may just assume that you’re inattentive rather than distracted, as so many other people are. Glass is designed to be out of direct range of vision, thus being less obtrusive. The fact is people may just spend a lot more time focusing on that spot rather than seeing what’s directly ahead.

Again, this is all subjective, and each person who uses Glass will react differently. Just think about how people are with their cell phones, however—being attached to them and distracted by them constantly. Is it possible that Google Glass might create the real zombie apocalypse? If so, will any of us even object to being taken by it?